Stove-board

  • Inventors:
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  • Publication Date: March 15, 1887
  • Publication Number: US-359353-A

Abstract

Claims

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE. A. IRVING GRIGGS, OF WESTFORD, NEIV YORK. STOVE-BOARD. sPECIPICATIQN forming part of Letters Patent No. 359,353, dated March 15, 1887. Application filed November 14, 1856. Serial No. 182,802. (No model To all whom it may concern: .Be it known that I, A. Invrve Games, a citizen of the United. States, and a resident of Westford, in the county of Otsego and State of New York, have invented certain Improvements in Stove-Boards and their Manufacture, of which the followingis a specification. My invention relates to the manufacture of stove-boards from sheet metal; and the invention consists partly in the process of manufacture and partly in the product or stove-board as an improved article of manufacture. The object of my invention is to produce a stiff, durable, cheap, andhandsome stove-board made from a single sheet of cheap material namely, tin-plate embossed throughout its entire extent; but this embossed tin-plate being a very refractory material, the usual means for beading the edge of the board cannot be employed, and, moreover, it is desirable to have the embossing on the plate extend over and ornament the bead also, and this embossing would be obliterated or marred by the spinning up of the bead, even if this process were practicable. Heretofore stove-boards have been made of sheets of brass and zinc, which are ductile metals and easily spun but brass is a costly material and zinc is lacking in stiffness and durability. Such boards have also been made from a sheet of tin cut to the proper shape, and a marginal strip of a ductile metal seamed to the edge of the tin-plate to form the ornamentalv bead. What is known as crystallized.tinplate, not embossed, has also been employed for making a stove-board, the edge of the plain plate being crimped down over the edge of a wooden backing. I mention the above constructions in order to illustrate the state of the art up to the present time. My invention in its entirety consists in first embossing the entire surface of a sheet of tinplate large enough to form the board; then cutting this embossed sheet to the proper form for the board; then passing the margin of the plate through a series of beadingrolls, whereby the raw edge of the metal is turned under or hemmed down and a raised molding or bead is formed on the edge or margin of the board without appreciably marring the embossing in the raised and molded part, and then applying a coating of a non-vitreous composition or varnish to the bright metallic upper surface of the board, which imparts to said board the color and luster of brass. I thus produce from the cheaper grades of heavy tin a stiff and durable board, which has the beauty and finish of the more expensive and less durable brass boards. The non-vitreous composition which I apply to my board is when dry very hard, glossy, tough, and refractory, and its composition is substantially as follows: To two parts, by measure, of linseed-oil and one part, by measure, of spirits of turpentine I add enough gum-copal or gum-dammar to give the properconsistency, and then add, as a coloring-matter, dragons-blood and gamboge in quantity sufficient to impart the proper tint and color of brass. Dragons-blood imparts a more or less coppery tint. This coating must be allowed to dry thoroughly, and artificial heat may be employed for the purpose. Any composition that possesses the above qualities may be employed to coat the board; but that above described will produce good results. I may apply this composition before the plate is embossed, or after the board is molded or beaded. I prefer to apply it after the heading. . In the drawings, which serve to illustratemy invention, Figure l is a face view of a stove-board constructed according to my invention. Fig. 2 is a. diametrical transverse section of the same on line 2 2 in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view on a large scale, designed to-show the transparent no11- vitreous coating on the board. a represents the molding on the margin of the board, over which, it will be seen, the embossed pattern extends in a continuous manner. b in Fig. 3 represents the coating on the face of the board, which gives the latter the appearance of brass. Having thus described my invention, I claim-- 1.The herein-described method of making a stove-board from a single sheet of refractory tin-plate, which consists in first embossing the entire surface of atin-plate of sufficient size to make the board, then cutting said plate to the proper size and shape for the board, and then forming on its edge or margin a molding or raised bead without effaci n g the embossing on the part forming said molding or bead. 2. The herein-described method of making a stove-board from a single sheet of refractory tin-plate, which consists in first embossing the entire surface of a tin-plate of sufficient size to make the board, then cutting said plate to the proper size and shape for the board, then forming on its edge or margin a molding or raised bead without effacing the embossing on the part forming said molding or bead, and, lastly, applying to the face of said board a non-vitreous coating, as described, to impart to the board the color and luster of brass. 3. As an improved article of manufacture, a stove-board constructed of a single sheet of embossed tin-plate with a molded edge, the embossed pattern of the plate extending continuonsly over the entire surface of said board and over the raised mold or bead on its edge, substantially as set forth. 4. As an improved article of manufacture, a stove-board constructed of a single sheet of. embossed tin-plate with a molded edge, the embossed pattern of the plate extending continuously over the entire surface of said board and over the raised mold or bead on its margin, and the face of said board covered with a transparent non-vitreous varnish,as described, whereby the color and luster of brass are imparted to the board, substantially as set forth. In witness whereof I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two subscribing witnesses. A. IRVING GRIGGS. \Vitnesses: ARTHUR C. FRASER, GEO. BAINTON.

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